• - 3:30pm - Allen 14
    CAM seminar
    Multiscale discontinuous Galerkin method for schrodinger equations
    Dr. Wei Wang, Mathematics and Statistics, Florida International University,

    Title:  Multiscale discontinuous Galerkin method for schrodinger equations
    Abstract:  In this talk we will introduce the multiscale discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for one-dimensional stationary Schrodinger equations. Because of the oscillatory behavior of the solutions, traditional numerical methods require extremely refined meshes to resolve the small scale structure of solutions, thus the computational cost is huge. The main ingredient of our method is to incorporate the small scales into finite element basis functions so that the method can capture the multiscale solution on coarse meshes.
    Link: http://cam.math.msstate.edu/sem20171109WW.html


  • - 4:00pm - Allen 411
    Annual Departmental Meet and Greet, You are invited and highly encouraged to attend the 1st Annual Departmental Meet and Greet on Friday, October 27th at 4pm in Allen 411. This will be a time to get to know each other and engage in conversation, as well as learn about faculty research topics. Food will be served in the lounge to be brought into the classroom.

  • - 3:00pm - Allen 14
    ACT seminar
    Detecting Local Properties of Fundamental Groups
    Dr. Jeremy Brazas, Mathematics, West Chester University,

    Title:  Detecting Local Properties of Fundamental Groups
    Abstract:  The algebraic structure of the fundamental group of a path-connected metric space X often depends heavily on the local structure of X. Roughly speaking, to verify local properties that characterize this kind of dependence, it is necessary to detect the existence of a specific homotopy given a certain, possibly infinite, arrangement of paths. In this talk I'll discuss joint work with Hanspeter Fischer that introduces a unified approach to characterizing and comparing a number of these properties by constructing closure operators on the π1-subgroup lattice in terms of maps from a fixed “test" domain.

    Biography: Dr. Brazas received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of New Hampshire in 2011 under the advisement of Dr. Maria Basterra. His primary research focus is in the area of algebraic topology. He is currently an Assistant Professor at West Chester University in West Chester, Pennsylvania.


  • - 3:30pm - Allen 14
    CAM seminar
    Dual-Mesh characteristics for particle-mesh methods for the simulation of convection-dominated flow
    Dr. Byungjoon Lee, Mathematics, Seoul National University, ,

    Title:  Dual-Mesh characteristics for particle-mesh methods for the simulation of convection-dominated flow
    Abstract:  The particle-mesh method (PMM) is a powerful computational tool for the simulation of convection-dominated diffusion flows. The method introduces computational particles each of which is given a finite size and represents a large number of physical particles with the same properties. The convection part of the flow can be solved by moving the computational particles along the characteristics, while the diffusion part is carried out by utilizing a heat solver on a regular mesh. However, the method in practical applications shows the so-called ringing instability, an amplitude fluctuation in the computed solution. In this talk, we suggest a new numerical technique of particle movement, called the dual-mesh characteristics (DMC) of which the second mesh is formed by tracking back the cells along the characteristics.The particle movement is carried out by interpreting the particle positions (in the previous time level) in terms of the multi-linear coordinates of the second mesh. Strategies for the average velocity and interpolations are also suggested to move the computational particles accurately with a minimum numerical dissipation. The resulting algorithm, PMM-DMC, turns out to be mass-conservative, non-oscillatory, of negligible dissipation, and more efficient than the conventional schemes. Numerical results are shown to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.
    Link: http://cam.math.msstate.edu/sem20171026BL.html


  • Past Seminars

Graduate Student Seminars

  • - 3:00pm - Allen 14
    Master's Presentation
    Analysis of diabetic incidence
    Yiyuan Ma, Statistics, Msstate,

    Title:  Analysis of diabetic incidence

  • - 3:30pm - Allen 14
    Master's Presentation
    Better metrics: AUC or AP?
    Matthew Kilpatrick, Statistics, Msstate,

    Title:  Better metrics: AUC or AP?

  • - 3:00pm - Allen 14
    Master's Presentation
    Fractal geometry in music
    Carly Herm, Mathematics, Msstate,

    Title:  Fractal geometry in music

  • - 3:30pm - Allen 14
    Master's Presentation
    Lightning strikes on aircraft
    Derrick Jones, Mathematics, Msstate,

    Title:  Lightning strikes on aircraft

  • Past Graduate Student Seminars

Research Seminars

  • - 3:30pm - Allen 14
    CAM seminar
    Multiscale discontinuous Galerkin method for schrodinger equations
    Dr. Wei Wang, Mathematics and Statistics, Florida International University,

    Title:  Multiscale discontinuous Galerkin method for schrodinger equations
    Abstract:  In this talk we will introduce the multiscale discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for one-dimensional stationary Schrodinger equations. Because of the oscillatory behavior of the solutions, traditional numerical methods require extremely refined meshes to resolve the small scale structure of solutions, thus the computational cost is huge. The main ingredient of our method is to incorporate the small scales into finite element basis functions so that the method can capture the multiscale solution on coarse meshes.
    Link: http://cam.math.msstate.edu/sem20171109WW.html

  • - 3:00pm - Allen 14
    ACT seminar
    Detecting Local Properties of Fundamental Groups
    Dr. Jeremy Brazas, Mathematics, West Chester University,

    Title:  Detecting Local Properties of Fundamental Groups
    Abstract:  The algebraic structure of the fundamental group of a path-connected metric space X often depends heavily on the local structure of X. Roughly speaking, to verify local properties that characterize this kind of dependence, it is necessary to detect the existence of a specific homotopy given a certain, possibly infinite, arrangement of paths. In this talk I'll discuss joint work with Hanspeter Fischer that introduces a unified approach to characterizing and comparing a number of these properties by constructing closure operators on the π1-subgroup lattice in terms of maps from a fixed “test" domain.

    Biography: Dr. Brazas received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of New Hampshire in 2011 under the advisement of Dr. Maria Basterra. His primary research focus is in the area of algebraic topology. He is currently an Assistant Professor at West Chester University in West Chester, Pennsylvania.

  • - 3:30pm - Allen 14
    CAM seminar
    Dual-Mesh characteristics for particle-mesh methods for the simulation of convection-dominated flow
    Dr. Byungjoon Lee, Mathematics, Seoul National University, ,

    Title:  Dual-Mesh characteristics for particle-mesh methods for the simulation of convection-dominated flow
    Abstract:  The particle-mesh method (PMM) is a powerful computational tool for the simulation of convection-dominated diffusion flows. The method introduces computational particles each of which is given a finite size and represents a large number of physical particles with the same properties. The convection part of the flow can be solved by moving the computational particles along the characteristics, while the diffusion part is carried out by utilizing a heat solver on a regular mesh. However, the method in practical applications shows the so-called ringing instability, an amplitude fluctuation in the computed solution. In this talk, we suggest a new numerical technique of particle movement, called the dual-mesh characteristics (DMC) of which the second mesh is formed by tracking back the cells along the characteristics.The particle movement is carried out by interpreting the particle positions (in the previous time level) in terms of the multi-linear coordinates of the second mesh. Strategies for the average velocity and interpolations are also suggested to move the computational particles accurately with a minimum numerical dissipation. The resulting algorithm, PMM-DMC, turns out to be mass-conservative, non-oscillatory, of negligible dissipation, and more efficient than the conventional schemes. Numerical results are shown to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.
    Link: http://cam.math.msstate.edu/sem20171026BL.html

  • - 3:30pm - Allen 14
    CAM seminar
    Optimization and Monitoring of Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing: Framework, Challenges, and Solutions.
    Dr. Linkan Bian, Industrial System Engineering,Msstate,

    Title:  Optimization and Monitoring of Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing: Framework, Challenges, and Some Solutions.
    Abstract:  The additive manufacturing (AM) process has the potential to propel the United States to a position of world-wide leadership in the production and repair of complex/precious part which will impact automotive, aerospace, biomedical, and other major industries. However, the highly dynamic thermo-physical transitions during the fabrication making it difficult to identify the operational conditions that result in targeted physical and mechanical properties. This variability and the associated uncertainty associated with AM processes leads to inadvertent and inevitable process anomalies (e.g., defects and porosity), causing fabricated parts lack of satisfactory quality to meet the requirements of industrial applications. We propose a theoretical framework to characterize the parameter-process-property relationships of AM, using a combined experimental and analytical approach. By optimizing the process parameters and characterizing in-situ process signals, we have demonstrated that our approach allows for the efficient fabrication full-dense parts with desired geometric accuracy and mechanical properties. Future work aims at transforming the AM procedure to a 'hands-off' operation governed by in-situ diagnostics and control which provides for customized parts for targeted applications.

    Biography: Linkan Bian is an assistant professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at Mississippi State University. He received his Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013 and a B.S. degree in Applied Mathematics from Beijing University. Dr. Bian research interests focus on the development of advanced data analytic methods for modeling and optimization of complex engineering systems. Applications of his research include additive manufacturing and supply chains. He has received federal funding from NSF, DoD, and DoE, as well as industrial companies. Dr. Bian's publications have appeared in journals such as IISE Transactions, Additive Manufacturing, Rapid Prototyping, IEEE Transactions, and other journals. Dr. Bian also received the Outstanding Young Investigator Award from IISE Manufacturing and Design subdivision.
    Link: http://cam.math.msstate.edu/sem20171019LB.html

  • Past Research Seminars